The perils of the SharePoint Cumulative Updates

There has always been trade-off when it comes to applying Cumulative Updates to your SharePoint Farm. You want to keep your Farm stable, secure and up-to-date, but there’s always the concern that an over-aggressive CU may cause some functionality issues for your end user. The recommended stance when it comes to CU’s is to only apply them to your Farm if there’s a compelling reason to do so – it fixes something!

Generally, SharePoint Service Packs are released by Microsoft having undergone a far more vigorous testing cycle in comparison to CU’s, and if there’s anyone out there still running SharePoint 2010 RTM and not SP1 I’d ask the question ‘why’?

Patching SharePoint is pretty simple; download the patch, apply it to every SharePoint Server in your Farm (excluding SQL or FAST), and then run PSConfig (starting with the Server(s) which are running Central Administration).

Despite this simplicity, I recently came across a SharePoint Farm where the build version wasn’t what I expected. The Farm had been manually patched to February 2012 CU but the build version was displaying April 2013 CU – the culprit, a SharePoint 2010 Foundation patch had been deployed, mistaken as a Windows Security patch. (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2810059). PSConfig had also been run as the databases had been showing the ‘Upgrade is required’ warning, and this has caused the Farm build version to iterate.

Unfortunately there is no roll-back option with SharePoint patches and therefore the only valid approach was to install what was essentially a year’s worth of SharePoint Server patches to bring the Farm comprehensively up to April 2013 CU (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2775353). And this is where the fun (actually pain) begun.

When I attempted to run the April 2013 CU SharePoint Server patch, I was stopped in my tracks by the following message:


SharePoint believed that the patches were already installed, so the way to circumvent this was to change the following registry value (on all the servers) to reflect the former build version (in this instance, Feb 2012 CU)

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Shared Tools\Web Server Extensions\14.0

14.0.06117 (Feb CU 2012)


 

Then, if I pass a switch below to the patch updater executable, we bypass the version check which is causing the update to fail:

ubersrv2010-kb2767793-fullfile-x64-glb.exe PACKAGE.BYPASS.DETECTION.CHECK=1


 

 

 

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